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Experienced Tax Attorneys


Call Us Confidentially Now: 202-349-4033


Call us confidentially now:
202-349-4033


Confidential & Experienced Tax Lawyers

Get Help Now: 202-349-4033

IRS Collection Due Process Hearings

The IRS is a notoriously aggressive debt collector with many collection tools available, including the ability to lien and levy on a taxpayer’s property. One way to attempt to stop IRS collection activity is to request a Collection Due Process (“CDP”) Hearing. Collection activity is usually frozen while the CDP hearing is pending.

A CDP hearing provides the taxpayer with an opportunity to have his case reviewed by an IRS Appeals Officer. At the hearing, the taxpayer has an opportunity to establish why the IRS should cease collection activity against him. The taxpayer can propose alternative collection methods such as an Offer in Compromise or Installment Agreement instead of federal tax liens and/or levies. In situations where the IRS has already rejected a proposed Offer in Compromise or Installment Agreement, the taxpayer can use the CDP hearing to request reconsideration. In some cases, the taxpayer can argue that the amount of the tax liability is incorrect or that he is not responsible for the entire amount.

For a conversation with a tax attorney experienced in CDP hearings, contact Kevin E. Thorn today at 202-349-4033.

 

 

 

 


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"Mr. Thorn and the attorneys at Thorn Law Group were so knowledgeable about the IRS Voluntary Disclosure Program and about the way the IRS Criminal Investigation Division works. Mr. Thorn helped put my mind at ease and walked me through the whole Voluntary Disclosure process. With the help of Thorn Law Group, and Mr. Thorn specifically, we were able to get back into compliance and were able to avoid criminal prosecution."